Wednesday, September 10, 2008

Reservist's science talent lights safer way in Iraq

From today's Boston Globe

Reservist's science talent lights safer way in Iraq
By Peter Schworm
Globe Staff / September 10, 2008


For seven months, Marine Sergeant Jason Cox patrolled near Fallujah, Iraq, from the turret of a Humvee, a gunner for a squad whose greatest fear was the unseen. Roadside bombs were the gravest threat, and often went undetected until it was too late.

So Cox, a graduate student in chemistry at Worcester Polytechnic Institute, put his scientific background to the test, designing a groundbreaking device that used infrared imaging to detect improvised explosives from a safer distance. With the help of other members of his unit, Cox worked during his few off-hours to modify existing thermal-imaging equipment to identify specific light characteristics, then tested the technique on patrols.

Able to identify remotely detonated devices from more than 200 yards, Cox's system proved an immediate success and marked a critical advance against the bombs. Cox's research, conducted during his tour in 2006, has now spurred the Marines to purchase new detection technology that incorporates Cox's findings.

Cox, a five-year reservist in the Marine Corps and a Worcester resident, was recently honored for his work with the US Navy and Marine Co rps Achievement Medal. The award recognizes Cox's "initiative, perseverance, and total dedication to duty," which honored "the highest traditions of the Marine Corps and the United States Naval Service."

Read the rest here.

BZ Sgt. Cox!

2 comments:

Pia said...

Oorah!

AFSister said...

Yes, but if he didn't pay attention in college, he'd end up in "Irak"!
Oh... WAIT!!!
He DID end up in Iraq, and he DID pay attention in class, and so much so that he's now using that education to save military and civilian lives.

Eat your words, Mr. Jon Cary.


All snarking aside, that is absolutely FAN-FREAKIN-TASTIC! What a WONDERFUL way to use your own knowledge and experience to invent a life saving device. OORAH, indeed!!!!!